A Rare Sears House in Bristow, Oklahoma … Route 66

On a trip through Bristow a few years ago I explored an area of town I missed, evidently, on other trips.  I have found a handful of mail order houses in Bristow and Bristow is the home to an absolute beautiful Aladdin Brentwood!  Bristow, Oklahoma is located along Historic Route 66.  In Bristow I also found a rare Sears 264P182.  Why rare?  The Sears 264P182 was only offered in the Sears Modern Homes catalogs between the years 1914 and 1916.  Another reason this house is rare is that at this time there are no other KNOWN 264P182’s!

(Click on images for a larger view)

The Sears 264P182 as it appeared in the Sears Modern Homes Catalogs 1915-1916

The Sears 264P182 as it appeared in the Sears Modern Homes Catalogs 1915-1916

 

Here are a few photos showing all sides of the Bristow Sears 264P182. The fenestration of the Bristow house matches the catalog perfectly!

 This view shows the left side of the house.

This view shows the left side of the house.

 

 Here is the front view of the 264P182 at 402 E 3rd Bristow, Okla .   I wonder if the home owner knows they have a rare Sears house?   I doubt it!

Here is the front view of the 264P182 at 402 E 3rd Bristow, Okla . I wonder if the home owner knows they have a rare Sears house? I doubt it!

 

Since we are looking at the front of the house let’s take a closer look at those pillars, this is remarkable! The pillars are part of the kit with the exception of the bricks or stones used on pillars. Masonry, cement etc, had to be purchased locally because of freight charges. Often, as a result, details as seen it the catalog images get left out during construction. Not THIS house!

The rails are no longer there, I'd bet they were there when the house was built.  But, take a look at the brick work on the pillars!  W :-O W!

The rails are no longer there, I’d bet they were there when the house was built. But, take a look at the brick work on the pillars! WOW!

 

Here is the catalog image of the house only.

Sears 1914 264P182 image

Sears 1914 264P182 image

 

Now, my photo of the Bristow house. This is the best I could do to get the catalog view because there were several cars parked at the side. But, I think you can see that the fenestration, once again, matches the catalog floor plan.

 How about that?  This house would be perfect for a complete restoration!  It could be restored to look just like the catalog image and what the house once was.  It needs some love and work but I think it is quite doable!!!

How about that? This house would be perfect for a complete restoration! It could be restored to look just like the catalog image and what the house once was. It needs some love and work but I think it is quite doable!!!

 

 

So, are you convinced? Do YOU think this is a Sears 164P182? Hold on, I have a few interior shots thanks to a real estate listing! This was a happy accident….I just found these a few days ago! I spy Sears millwork inside, I KNOW this is a Sears house!

 This image is from my Sears Building Materials 1912 catalog.  It was the buffet included with this model.  If you read the specifications in the catalog page at the top you will see the 264P182 included a buffet and you can see it in the floor sketch.

This image is from my Sears Building Materials 1912 catalog. It was the buffet included with this model. If you read the specifications in the catalog page at the top you will see the 264P182 included a buffet and you can see it in the floor sketch.

 

Here is the buffet from the Bristow house courtesy of the real estate listing and the buffet from my millwork catalog.....for comparison.  It needs to be restored but, doable!

Here is the buffet from the Bristow house courtesy of the real estate listing and the buffet from my millwork catalog…..for comparison. It needs to be restored but, doable!

 

One more photo…courtesy of the real estate listing. This photo gives us a view from the living room in to the dining room in front picturing the built in buffet. To the right through the door is the vestibule which you can see in the floor plans in the first catalog image. There is NO DOUBT in my mind that this is a rare Sears 264P182! And, it is in OKLAHOMA!!! The land of very few Sears homes or none depending on who you ask LOL

This photo was shot from the living room and shows the vestibule doorway, a look in to the dining room and the entry to the pantry/kitchen area.

This photo was shot from the living room and shows the vestibule doorway, a look in to the dining room and the entry to the pantry/kitchen area. The doorway to the far left leads to the hall and the back bedroom and the bathroom

 

To see more interior photos you can see the real estate listing here. I found this house a few years ago and wasn’t aware it was listed later….otherwise I would have gone to see it!

Do you know where there is a Sears 264P182? The catalog page says there were others built and I looked all over Watervliet, NY this weekend and no luck. I did find some other kit homes though.

How about a kit home? Do you have one to report? Do you need help identifying a possible catalog home? If so contact me here or at searshomes@yahoo.com

Do you agree that this house in Bristow, Oklahoma is a Sears 264P182? If so leave a comment….if not leave a comment and tell me why ;)

Now, if I may be excused, I think I will take a look in Indianapolis Indiana to see if I can find the one built there ;)

Tulsa Oklahoma Houses by Mail, Sears Homes, Wardway, Aladdin and more

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14 Responses to A Rare Sears House in Bristow, Oklahoma … Route 66

  1. sdaven5191 says:

    Good luck finding it in Indianapolis! You might look off of Washington Street, or US40 which is also National Road through several of the eastern United States. Lots of potential there in areas just east of downtown, in areas like Irvington. There have been lots of kit homes already located there, and around Garfield Park, which is south of downtown. Possibilities also exist in Fountain Square, between downtown and Garfield Park. Also, there is a well-known development of homes that was the first planned “neighborhood” east of Indianapolis proper back in the early 1900s, called Woodruff Place. It used to be an actual gated community, is a historically protected area, and has its own neighborhood restoration association, with some extremely strict guidelines for what you can and cannot do with your protected home. The housing stock there varies from Victorians to 1930s English Bungalows, and all in between. I’ve been through there before, driving round and round on their one-way drives, separated by wide grassy medians, with fountains and original statues of animals, and gazebos. Very cool place. There’s also the Little Flower area, east of Woodruff Place, with tons of bungalows, but may be a little more “new” than what you’re after. The areas you’re looking for can be pretty run down too, depending on exactly where they are and how long they have been turned into rental property.
    Let me know if you need pictures of anything. All I need is an address!

    • Yeah, LOL. Finding this little bungalow in Dallas or Indianapolis would be like looking for a needle in a haystack piled in a Sears kit barn out in a cow pasture………PURE LUCK! The town in Watervliet is my best bet, not much changed there really, not around where I suspect it was likely built. Not a bad google drive though, I plopped my little google guy right in front of an Aladdin Detroit right off the bat! What a surprise. Also found a Sears Avalon, a GVT 158/712 while “cruising”. Hard to find those without a name to search by :/

      Keep your eye out for it! If you check those images in flickr you can see them really large!

      • sdaven5191 says:

        Unfortunately, this also came to mind. Back in the “take no prisoners spare no real estate” days of massive interstate construction of the 1970s and 1980s, many of the neighborhoods of the vintage where these little homes were/are located, were ravaged by the bull dozers and weilders of “Eminent Domain” laws. There are several interstates which encircle (I-465), converge and run through (I-70, I-65, I-69, I-74) as well as other roadway construction/reconstruction/destruction that over the years have obliterated whole neighborhoods, and left others sitting on the edges of and being split in half by ribbons of noisy, high-speed asphalt. I see into some folk’s bedroom windows and other’s kitchen windows depending on which side of town I’m driving through, some of them several stories up in the air! That’s what makes looking for particular homes very difficult, besides urban decay, fires/arson, tornadoes and even floods in some areas near rivers and low lying areas ravaged by heavy rainfalls. I’ve seen old homes disappear from all of these, plus the inevitable urban redevelopment. There are many areas of Indianapolis that are basically unrecognizable from 10 or 20 years ago. And most of those are areas of older homes of course. There are also some of the protected areas I mentioned previously, which have come about in more recent times.
        I also forgot to mention Broad Ripple as an area of historically protected bungalows and similar vintage homes. Beautiful little homes mostly, landscaped, beautiful old-growth trees, narrow streets, very “artsy” neighborhood and retail area. Cute and extremely popular = high dollar houses! I would love to live there, but the resources for doing it just don’t exist at our age!
        Anyway, I thought I would throw that in regarding searching for homes in Indianapolis! Yes, the needle in the haystack theory, indeed!

  2. lizmcmahan@windstream.net says:

    We hope you have next month’s Wagoner County Historical Society meeting on your calendar. We have you down as guest speaker. Sept. 15, 6:30 p.m., Pizza Hut. Thanks!

  3. Jo Ann Walker Merrifield says:

    The information I have the house was built in 1907. It was a 4 room house with a full front porch and a sleeping porch at the back. No bathroom. Address route 2, Poteau, Ok.

    • You can send photos to me at searshomes@yahoo.com I need to see both sides and the front.
      With a 1907 date ( IF is indeed a kit home) it will have to be from Aladdin. Gordon Van Tine didn’t offer homes until 1907 and what you describe can’t be an early GVT, Sears didn’t start offering homes until 1908.

  4. Maja Barnett says:

    I own this property

    • Did you have any idea it was a Sears kit home?

    • Maja, this is a very rare Sears house. There aren’t any other known of this exact model out there. My friend, Rosemary Thornton, who has written books on kit houses has seen one once but she can’t find the photo and doesn’t remember where. So, at this point this is the only known in that we know where *it* is. I hope that you will keep this house as intact as possible. I found your house a couple of years ago and had whiplash from the jolt when I saw it! In OKLAHOMA! Bristow is very fortunate to have such a treasure.

      • Maja Barnett says:

        That is very cool to know,I have no intent to change anything on it other, then it needs a new roof

  5. Maja Barnett says:

    Also it no longer has a pantry, and the porch has been enclosed into a large laundry room

  6. Maja Barnett says:

    Also it is no longer for sale

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