Massive and Ornamental – The Sears Auburn

Once again I stumbled on a Sears house by accident. That happens a lot. Most of them I pass over but this one was unique, not a model that you see every day or that hasn’t been shared much yet I guess I should say. I was searching for something completely different in google images and a familiar image pops up. That image led me to a real estate listing and whatever I was searching for was forgotten and here I am.

Maybe you have seen a house like this?

(You may see all images in full resolution by clicking on the image.)

In the 1918 Sears Modern Homes catalog the Sears Auburn is described as Massive and Ornamental. The Auburn is a four square with approximately 2400 square feet and another 500 square feet if you count the porches off the back. And, ornamental, yes ... compared to most four squares it is ornamental.

In the 1918 Sears Modern Homes catalog the Sears Auburn is described as Massive and Ornamental. The Auburn is a four square with approximately 2400 square feet and another 500 square feet if you count the porches off the back. And, ornamental, yes … well compared to most four squares it is.

 

 

The Sears Modern Homes Auburn was first offered in late 1911 as model 176 as seen on the left. I used the Fall 1913 catalog image. This house as seen here was offered until mid 1914. At that time there was an exterior design change and a few minor changes to the interior. The image on the right shows these changes. This image is from my fall 1914 catalog. In the fall of 1916 this model is offered as already cut and fitted C2046 OR not cut and fitted C176. In 1917 it appears the not ready cut model is dropped and only the C2046 is offered and in 1918 this model is renamed the Auburn when all Sears houses were given names. This model was offered through 1925.

The Sears Modern Homes Auburn was first offered in late 1911 as model 176 as seen on the left. I used the Fall 1913 catalog image. This house as seen here was offered until mid 1914. At that time there was an exterior design change and a few minor changes to the interior.
The image on the right shows these changes. This image is from my fall 1914 catalog. In the fall of 1916 this model is offered as already cut and fitted C2046 OR not cut and fitted C176. In 1917, it appears or so it seems,  the not ready cut model is dropped and only the C2046 is offered.   In 1918 this model is renamed the Auburn when all Sears houses were given names. This model was offered through 1925.

 

This is the house that distracted me from what I was searching for originally. Since there aren't many of these known I clicked to see what I could find out. This Sears Auburn was built in rural Bruce South Dakota in 1918, according to the real estate listing. This photo is from the real estate listing. The listing doesn't mention it being from Sears so maybe they don't know, maybe they do, if not they will know soon enough ;)

This is the house that distracted me from what I was searching for originally. Since there aren’t many of these known I clicked to see what I could find out.
This Sears Auburn was built in rural Bruce South Dakota in 1918, according to the real estate listing.  The listing doesn’t mention it being from Sears so maybe they don’t know, maybe they do, if not they will know soon enough 😉  Photo courtesy of real estate listing.

 

This is the back of the Sears Modern Homes Auburn in Bruce South Dakota. All of the porches have been enclosed. This house has the distinctive brick pattern columns, the same rafter tail pattern around the eaves, the fenestration matches (other than the front door) as well as a few other architectural details so I'm pretty confident it is a Sears Auburn. The listing reports 1918 and it might be slightly custom or a transitional model. When I viewed the listing I noticed a few changes to the interior floor plan. Very minor changes.

This is the back of the Sears Modern Homes Auburn in Bruce South Dakota. All of the porches have been enclosed.
This house has the distinctive brick pattern columns, the same rafter tail pattern around the eaves, the fenestration matches (other than the front door) as well as a few other architectural details so I’m pretty confident it is a Sears Auburn. The listing reports 1918 and it might be slightly custom or a transitional model. When I viewed the listing I noticed a few changes to the interior floor plan. Very minor changes.

 

To see more photos of this house click here for the real estate listing.

Rosemary Thornton has a few blogs showing an Auburn. Here’s one she wrote recently! Check it out!

Have you seen a Sears 176/Auburn somewhere? If so please contact me at searshomes@yahoo.com.

You can see other wonderful homes and blog posts of both Rosemary Thornton and me on facebook if you click here.

And, you can join our closed Sears Homes group on facebook too if you want to learn how to recognize kit homes and pattern book homes!

Follow me on twitter!
Tulsa Oklahoma Houses by Mail, Sears Homes, Wardway, Aladdin and more

Creative Commons License
Oklahoma Houses By Mail by Rachel Shoemaker is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Advertisements

About Rachel Shoemaker

I've been hooked on finding and or identifying mail order homes since 2008. I'm not picky, kit homes from Sears Modern Homes, Aladdin Ready Cut, Gordon Van Tine, Wardway Homes, all of the major companies as well as the popular pattern and plan book homes built from about 1900 and on. Could you be living in one of these homes? Send me an email: searshomes@yahoo.com
This entry was posted in Kit Homes Around the Country and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s