Gordon Van Tine 156, A Wonderfully Cozy, Comfortable Home, Very Popular

Creative Commons License

Bungalows are popular and attractive, but many do not care for the extreme features of the true bungalow. We have, therefore, tried to combine the bungalow appearance with that of a comfortable cottage, and the result as shown in this plan is certainly pleasing. We might call it a semi-bungalow. It has the broad low lines and the wide eaves, yet the siding, porch trim, and general exterior appearance are typical of the comfortable cottage. On the interior we depart from the bungalow by having two bedrooms on the second floor.

Using testimonials I was able to locate three examples of the Gordon Van Tine 156

All images may be seen in full resolution by clicking on the image.

the Gordon Van Tine 156 was offered a few short years from 1912-1916. It was offered as a standard, not ready cut home only.

the Gordon Van Tine 156 was offered a few short years from 1912-1916. It was offered as a standard, not ready cut home only.

 

Warren Lathrop, a florist at a hat house, built this Gordon Van Tine 156 in Hingham, Massachusetts. We get a good look in this image from the current owner, a chiropractor. Dr. John Daoust. I wonder if he knows his office building is a kit home?

Warren Lathrop, a florist at a hat house, built this Gordon Van Tine 156 in Hingham, Massachusetts. We get a good look in this image from the current owner, a chiropractor. Dr. John Daoust. I wonder if he knows his office building is a kit home?

 

William D Miner, a real estate agent, built this Gordon Van Tine 156 in Ness City, Kansas.

William D Miner, a real estate agent, built this Gordon Van Tine 156 in Ness City, Kansas.

 

This Gordon Van Tine 156 was built in Fort Dodge, Iowa, by John Ekland who was a carpenter.

This Gordon Van Tine 156 was built in Fort Dodge, Iowa, by John Ekland who was a carpenter.

 

If you happen to see this wonderfully cozy, comfortable bungalow-cottage please email me and let me know!  searshomes@yahoo.com  Or,  you can contact me through Sears Modern Homes on facebook.

To see a set of Gordon Van Tine blueprints click here!

To learn more about kit homes and meet other enthusiasts as well as home owners join us in the Sears Homes Group on facebook!

For more information on the Gordon Van Tine Company of Davenport, Iowa visit the website of Dale Wolicki , here.

My friend Rosemary Thornton has featured several Gordon Van Tine homes on her blog.

To see more Gordon Van Tine catalogs online click here.

And, to see the  beautiful covers from Gordon Van Tine catalogs click here.

Come back for my next blog to see more from Gordon Van Tine!  And no, I don’t just identify Gordon Van Tine…I’m just polishing my GVT identification skills and knowledge right now.   I’ll be honest. I do love Gordon Van Tine though!

I have several awesome homes to share from blog readers,  a Sears 119 in Iowa comes to mind, a Lewis Vitello that Mark Hardin found, a Henry Wilson bungalow in Nova Scotia that I identified for a reader.  A Wardway Barcelona shared by a reader.  It just never ends!  I love hearing from readers.  searshomes@yahoo.com  Send me your homes and your questions.

Follow me on twitter!

Tulsa Oklahoma Houses by Mail, Sears Homes, Wardway, Aladdin and more

Creative Commons License
Oklahoma Houses By Mail by Rachel Shoemaker is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Advertisements

About Rachel Shoemaker

I've been hooked on finding and or identifying mail order homes since 2008. I'm not picky, kit homes from Sears Modern Homes, Aladdin Ready Cut, Gordon Van Tine, Wardway Homes, all of the major companies as well as the popular pattern and plan book homes built from about 1900 and on. Could you be living in one of these homes? Send me an email: searshomes@yahoo.com
This entry was posted in Gordon Van Tine, Kit Homes Around the Country and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s